fleeting-endeavours

One day you wake up and you’re twenty-three and you can’t remember what it feels like to be seventeen but you still cry to your Mum after a bad day and you look a little older but you don’t really feel it. One day you’re twenty-three and your great aunt is telling you how mature you look and how you grew a little taller, but inside you still remember sitting under the oak tree reading with no meetings tomorrow and no rent to pay, and the only thing you can think about is how at seventeen you thought at twenty-three you would know everything and now you can’t remember how you got from there to here, but seventeen year old you was wrong; because you only know some things and not everything.

You know that coffee tastes better in the mornings and your home isn’t your home anymore it’s ‘Mum and Dads’. You know your car needs servicing every six months and groceries are harder to do after break ups. She liked cookie dough and walnuts and strawberry flavoured milk and now every time you go to the store you can’t buy spaghetti without remembering it was a Friday night, and she kissed you for the first time and the heat from her skin could have set your entire place on fire. One day you’re twenty-three and you’re trying to explain to a seventeen year old all the mistakes you made so they won’t make them too, when all you really want is for someone to realise you still don’t have the first clue.

one day you’re 23 - c.p (via bonebasket)
fleeting-endeavours
Some historians told me 200 million Blacks died during slavery. The smallest number I got from anybody was 60 million. There were travel accounts of people who were in the Congo—that’s a wide river—saying, ‘We could not get the boat through the river, it was choked with bodies.’ That’s like a logjam. A lot of people died. Half of them died in those ships. Slave trade was like cocaine is now—even though it was against the law, that didn’t stop anybody. Imagine getting $1,000 for a human being. That’s a lot of money. There are fortunes in this country that were made that way.
Toni Morrison (via sonofbaldwin)